psychophilosophy by jake

Jake Teeny head shot in a blue shirt

When We Got It Wrong

Posted by in Philosophy, Psychology | 1 comment

When We Got It Wrong

Facts are facts and will not disappear on account of your likes. — Jawaharlal Nehru For the last week and a half, I have been at summer camp for social psychologists. No, that isn’t a made-up thing. And yes, I am an adult. (Well, kind of.) From 9:00am – 5:00pm every day, I have been taking classes with two of the foremost professors on psychological interventions: programs that implement social psychology to improve the world around them. But social programs like this aren’t always based on rigorous empirical research, and when they’re...

read more

Save the Internet!

Posted by in Motivation, Psychology | 0 comments

Save the Internet!

The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow. — Bill Gates By the end of 1969, four computers worldwide made up the Internet. By the mid-1980s, this “networking system” had expanded to dozens of universities as it let scholars easily search and collaborate on research all across the country. In 1992, the first web browser (i.e., Netscape) was developed, allowing people everywhere to access this “World Wide Web.” And exactly 25 years later, we have the Internet as it is: One of the most widespread,...

read more

Who Helps Whom?

Posted by in Interpersonal, Motivation, Psychology | 0 comments

Who Helps Whom?

We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don’t know. — W.H. Auden In the 5th grade, a nameless young girl saved my life. Well, she saved me $0.75, which is kind of like saving one’s life at that age. At a garage sale, I found a basketball signed by Damon Stoudamire, one of my favorite players at the time. And for this signed ball, the adult was only charging $0.75… Say whaaaaaaaaa? Sprinting home for the coins (I believe I broke some kind of land speed record), I returned to find...

read more

The Sunk Cost Fallacy

Posted by in Psychology, Social Cognition | 2 comments

The Sunk Cost Fallacy

To terminate a project in which $1.1 billion has been invested represents an unconscionable mishandling of taxpayers’ dollars. – Senator Jeremiah Denton, 1981 (in response to critics who showed that the total cost of this Waterway Project would be more money than it could ever make) I’m going to describe an experience that my psychophilosophy powers tells me you’ve had: Not long ago, you went out to eat and ordered a meal your taste buds disagreed with. However, even though you didn’t enjoy the food, you continued to chomp and...

read more

The Invisible Influence of Cell Phones

Posted by in Psychology, Social Cognition, The Self | 0 comments

The Invisible Influence of Cell Phones

Cell phones are so convenient that they’re inconvenient. — Haruki Murakami If you were being mugged and had to give up either your wallet or your cell phone, which would you choose? In formulating your own answer, you probably tried to determine which of those two items was more replaceable (or rather, why the mugger was only asking for one of them…). For many people, their phone has become more indispensable than the cards in their wallet. But is that indispensability a good thing? According to the news, cell phones are awful,...

read more

Choice Blindness

Posted by in Attitudes, General, Psychology, Social Cognition | 0 comments

Choice Blindness

When you have to make a choice and don’t make it, that is in itself a choice. — William James (the father of psychology) The other day, my girlfriend had a photoshoot, and she asked for my opinion on which of two shirts to wear. With my advanced degree in boyfriendology, I provided a very thoughtful response. As the actual photoshoot neared, however, my girlfriend again asked for my preference, and once more, I pointed to the same shirt and gave a similarly thoughtful explanation. …Except as I learned a few moments later,...

read more

The Scarlet T

Posted by in Attitudes, Attribution, Culture, Interpersonal, Psychology, ST & Prejudice | 5 comments

The Scarlet T

You must learn a new way to think before you can master a new way to be.  — Marianne Williamson Today’s topic took a bit of courage for me to write about. It’s hard to put any version of yourself on the Internet that isn’t perfect, our strong social motivations always wanting to portray ourselves from the most flattering angles. So, to publicly inform others of something “negative” about oneself can be rather scary. But I suppose that’s why I’m writing today’s post—because what I want to talk about is still seen as a negative....

read more

Improve Yourself with One Word

Posted by in Attribution, Psychology, Social Cognition | 2 comments

Improve Yourself with One Word

Mind is a flexible mirror, adjust it, to see a better world. — Amit Ray I have a question for you: When that voice inside your head tries to get you motivated, does it say things like, “I can do this?” or “You can do this?” Although this may seem like a trivial difference, the research on this distinction is rather impressive. When we talk about ourselves,  we tend to use first-person pronouns (e.g., “I” or “me”). On the other hand, when we refer to or describe others, we almost exclusively use words like “you,” “he,” “she,” or the...

read more

Are Safe Spaces Helpful?

Posted by in Attribution, General, Psychology, ST & Prejudice | 2 comments

Are Safe Spaces Helpful?

People demand freedom of speech as compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use. — Soren Kierkegaard At the commencement address for University of Notre Dame’s 2017 graduating class, Vice President Pence had the following to say: Far too many campuses across America have become characterized by speech codes, safe zones, tone policing, administration-sanctioned political correctness—all of which amounts to nothing less than suppression of the freedom of speech… Indeed, commentators across the country have expressed...

read more

Shocking Statistics

Posted by in General, Psychology | 2 comments

Shocking Statistics

In America, the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires. — Ronald Wright Let’s begin today with a little game: First, I want you to click on this link and read the instructions/description on that page. Once you’ve done that, I’d like you to actually ask yourself: How do you believe the wealth is currently divided in the US? For example, of the top 20% earners, how much of the “total pie” do they own? Think about it for a moment, but likely, you pictured something close to the...

read more
0 Shares
Share
Pin
Tweet
Email